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Office Hours: Monday - Friday: 8:00am - 3:00pm      High School Uniforms: Red & White Polo's    Middle School Uniforms: Blue & Grey Polo's    Pants: Blue/ Khaki Pants - NO CARGO PANTS or Skinny Pants
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Mrs. Yaremis Vega

2011-2012 Bell Schedule (NEW!)

  High School Schedule: 

1st Period 7:30 – 8:23 (Everyday) 
2nd/3rd Period 8:30 – 10:15 (Homeroom/Announcements) 
4th/5th Period 10:22 - 12:46 

Lunch A: 10:22 – 10:52 
Lunch B: 11:00 – 11:30 
Lunch C: 11:38 – 12:08 
Lunch D: 12:16 – 12:46 

6th/7th Period 12:53 – 2:30 

Middle School Schedule: 

2nd/3rd Period 8:30 – 10:15 (Homeroom/Announcements) 
4th/5th Period 10:22 -12:46 

Lunch A: 10:22 – 10:52 
Lunch B: 11:00 – 11:30 
Lunch C: 11:38 – 12:08 
Lunch D: 12:16 – 12:46 

6th/7th Period 12:46 – 2:30 
8th Period 2:37 – 3:30 (Everyday) 

  
The school runs the entire year on an alternate A / B block schedule and (7) minutes between class changes 
“A” days in the high school are periods 1, 3, 5, 7 
“B” days in the high school are periods 1, 2, 4, 6 
  
"A" days in the middle school are periods 3, 5, 7, 8 
"B" days in the middle school are periods 2, 4, 6, 8

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The timeline is a great way to organize your high school years so that you choose those strategies that will benefit you most in accomplishing your academic goals.
 
9th Grade
  • Get to know your teachers, counselors and administrators
  • Visit Facts.org and create an Epep account
    • The Epep account will help you monitor your progress toward high school graduation and Florida Bright Futures
  • Become familiar with high school graduation requirements
  • Speak with your counselor about taking advanced courses
  • Begin earning good grades now. The grades you earn in ninth grade will be included in your final high school grade point average (GPA) 
  • Consider taking the PSAT  
  • Learn about requirements for Dual Enrollment Scholars Program
  • Review the grade level promotion requirements
  • Get involved in extracurricular activities
  • Plan your summers wisely: begin your community service project, work on your summer reading and participate in college summer programs.
  • Create a student portal account so you can monitor your grades and attendance.
10th Grade
  • Maintain good grades and know how to improve your GPA
  • If you failed a course in ninth grade speak with your counselor about making up credits or raising your GPA in night school or virtual school
  • Take the PSAT in October
  • Become familiar with college entrance requirements
  • Continue working on your community service project and remember to get all required signatures
  • Talk to your counselor about the Scholars Program
  • Begin researching postsecondary options (e.g. college, vocational programs, career choices)
  • Plan your summers wisely: begin your community service project, work on your summer reading and participate in college summer programs.
11th Grade
  • Review your graduation status with your counselor
  • Formulate post-high school plans 
  • Prepare for college entrance exams and become familiar with registration dates and deadlines. 
  • Consider taking test prep courses 
  • Continue taking math, foreign language, science and history courses 
  • Make sure you are taking or planning to take courses that will fulfill college requirements 
  • Talk to your CAP Advisor about your future plans and visit the College Assistance Program website
  • Continue being involved in a club or sport
  • Become familiar with college admission requirements
  • Consider taking the PSAT
  • Take the ASVAB Career Exploration Test to explore possible career paths
  • Plan your summers wisely: begin your community service project, work on your summer reading, participate in college summer programs and visit college campuses
12th Grade

  • Discuss your graduation status with your counselor
  • Review and apply for financial aid and scholarships
  • Complete college applications, tests and entrance requirements before December 1st
  • Complete your community service project by December 1st
  • Ask your teachers to assist you with writing college essays or scholarships essays.
  • Attend college presentations
  • Talk to your CAP Advisor about your future plans.
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WHAT IS TEST ANXIETY?

Too much anxiety about a test is commonly referred to as test anxiety. It is perfectly natural to feel some anxiety when preparing for and taking a test. In fact, a little anxiety can jump start your studying and keep you motivated. However, too much anxiety can interfere with your studying. You may have difficulty learning and remembering what you need to know for the test. Further, too much anxiety may block your performance during the test. You may have difficulty demonstrating what you know during the test.
 
HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE TEST ANXIETY?
You probably have test anxiety if you answer YES to four or more of the following:
  • I have a hard time getting started studying for a test.
  • When studying for a test, I find many things that distract me.
  • I expect to do poorly on a test no matter how much or how hard I study.
  • When taking a test, I experience physical discomfort such as sweaty palms, an upset stomach, a headache, difficulty breathing, and tension in my muscles.
  • When taking a test, I find it difficult to understand the directions and questions.
  • When taking a test, I have difficulty organizing my thoughts.
  • When taking a test, I often "draw a blank."
  • When taking a test, I find my mind wandering to other things.
  • I usually score lower on a test than I do on assignments and papers.
  • After a test, I remember information I couldn't recall during the test.
WHAT CAN I DO ABOUT TEST ANXIETY?
 
Here are some things you can do before, during, and after a test to reduce your test anxiety.
  • Use good study techniques to gain cognitive mastery of the material that will be covered on the test. This mastery will help you to approach the test with confidence rather than have excessive anxiety.
  • Employ the tips we provide at Study Habits.
  • Maintain a positive attitude as you study. Think about doing well, not failing. Think of the test as an opportunity to show how much you have learned.
  • Go into the test well rested and well fed. Get enough sleep the night before the test. Eat a light and nutritious meal before the test. Stay away from junk foods.
  • Stay relaxed during the test. Taking slow, deep breaths can help. Focus on positive self-statements such as "I can do this."
  • Follow a plan for taking the test such as the DETER strategy we describe at A Strategy for Taking Tests. Don't panic even if you find the test difficult. Stay with your plan!
  • Don't worry about other students finishing the test before you do. Take the time that you need to do your best.
  • Once you finish the test and hand it in, forget about it temporarily. There is nothing more you can do until the graded test is returned to you. Turn your attention and effort to new assignments and tests.
  • When the graded test is returned to you, analyze it to see how you could have done better. Learn from your mistakes and from what you did well. Apply this knowledge when you take the next test.
  • You have to know the material to do well on a test. You have to control test anxiety to show what you know.